Concept of radiometric dating

19 Jan

Question: "How does radiometric dating fit with the view of a young earth?

" Answer: Radiometric dating does not fit with the “young earth” view.

This is all seemingly fine until you evaluate the assumptions that this system is built upon.

In order for the radiometric dating system to be accurate, the system would: a.) Need to be a closed system. That is, that the process was not or is not affected by any outside or inside influences. Since the establishment of the system, the decay or process rate has remained stable and unchanged.

By measuring the ratio of lead to uranium in a rock sample, its age can be determined.

It is rapidly oxidized in air to form carbon dioxide and enters the global carbon cycle.

To gain an index of time since the original formation of the system, you document the relative proportions of the two components.

Therefore, based on the certain amounts of the components in a sample, you can tell how old the sample is.

The three key underlying assumptions are 1) the rate of decay of parent into daughter has remained constant throughout the unobservable past; 2) the specimen which we are examining hasn’t been contaminated in any way (that is, no parent or daughter has been added or taken away at any point during the unobservable past), and 3) we can determine how much parent and daughter were present at the beginning of the decay process – not all of the Pb206 present today necessarily came from decaying U238; Pb206 may have been part of the original constitution of the specimen.

If any of these assumptions are wrong, the method cannot accurately determine the age of a specimen.